Value your needs by slowing down

It is so easy to get caught up in the fast paced moments in life.
Going from one place to the next. Doing one thing to the next.
Sometimes, (insert the metaphor) “running around forgetting that my head is attached to my
body.”

Slowing down may not seem like an option. There may not be an understanding of how to do it.
Thoughts of, “how can I afford to slow down when there is so much to do and there is not
enough time to do it all?”

Slowing down gives the opportunity to tend to your own needs while also creating healthy
momentum through presence. It allows someone to “be there” for others attentively.

It adds quality to the moments of interaction and connection. By slowing down, you also give
yourself time to process and reflect. There is the creation of perspective. In doing so, it
nourishes mental health.

Without taking time to slow down in life, it could lead to anxiety and neglect of personal care.
Then it is a constant feeling of, “I need to do more” because you might feel you are not doing
enough. Not tending to your own needs.

Some easy and effective ways to slow down are:

  • Take a mini break to check in with yourself
  • Feel yourself breathing, bring attention to your breath and control it with deep, slow
    breaths
  • Spend some time in nature
  • Schedule times to put away the cell phone
  • Set priorities and boundaries – commit to them
  • Manage time efficiently through organization and delegation
    Eat slower

There may be resistance to slowing down. It may be something that has just been part of
everyday life for as long as you can remember.

 

The creation of slower-paced moments in life is a choice that rejuvenates the mind and soul.
The creation of calming peace in your day.

 

It simply equates to presence. In presence there is freedom from worry about the future or past doubts.
Time is flexible and can be adjusted in many different ways. The perception of time and it’s
limitations is what makes it rigid and fixed.

When your needs are valued, life can be enjoyed in all it’s moments because you slowed down
to be in them with presence.

The anxiety of a racing mind and worried heart is not wrong. Maybe it is something you believe is wrong?

Anxiety Situation

Imagine you have a big presentation, an event or a speech in a few hours.

Maybe there are many “what-if’s” that begin to enter your mind.

Your imagination starts to take over and your heart is beating faster, trembling of nerves tense your body. You can’t think normally with clear thoughts.

You feel like you have already lost the confidence to do your best.

Trying so desperately to win a self made validation that isn’t real.

The misleading prize is assurance that the outcome will be what you want.

What if the outcome does not happen or questions arise about the possibilities that might prevent it from happening,? Worry and concern creep into the moment.

It is something we have all experienced in our life.

Anxiety and worry is nothing to be ashamed of.

It is part of our survival makeup.

Anxiety is something that becomes a constant background noise that is learned to cope with. It is not comfortable or enjoyable. It becomes something that is hard to turn off.

How can you accept worry and concern when it disrupts clarity of  how you would like to function in the moment?

There are ways to reduce the intensity, (possibly turn it off) to trust in who you are and what you are doing again.

First step is to stop, take a step back. Reassess the situation. Acknowledge the worry and question with curiosity the purpose of the worry and what can be done to alleviate the worry right now.

Breathe. Take deep, controlled breaths. Place your focus on the breath as you inhale and exhale. Pausing to hold between inhale and exhale.

Count to 10 slowly, and when you reach 10, say to yourself, “I am safe.” “I will be okay.”

Assure yourself you will get through this experience, and place gratitude that you are alive and get to have this experience.

Create a new meaning of failure. Whatever the outcome is, respect the things that make it successful regardless what the result is.

Releasing the shame surrounding anxiety is an available choice. The decision to let go of the idea, “I’m not good enough” because of experiencing anxiety or worry is powerful transformational acceptance.

Reframing the approach to a situation and acknowledging the present moment means you have already won the prize.