Clarity About Urgency To Live

The convergence of urgency and comfort invites an opportunity to shift an experience with an altered perception of time.

A perception of time could be swayed by thoughts or feelings on both extremes of the spectrum.  One perception is the distorted illusion of unlimited time and the other extreme could be the belief of being stuck in moments or experiences.

When I think of time, from the standpoint from beginning to end in the current life, it does not seem unlimited. I also think of time as being infinite. The belief that time has no end. It seems like a confliction of what time is. It could be subjective if someone believes that physical life may end, and the spiritual journey continues.

To focus on the specific physical presence in life would suggest there is a path to the end.

When the end appears, there can be an assumption that there are many reflective insights that arise for the time lived.

Documented thoughts from others near the end of their life include appreciations, regrets, forgiveness, remorse, love.

Why it takes a lifetime to realize the reflective insights

The false reality many people hold in their mind is commonly mistaking they have unlimited time in their life.

At what points in life do people start thinking about time as a precious gift?

Usually there are disruptions or reminders that interrupt the false reality of unlimited time.

It could be when someone close, like a best friend or family member passes away. A revelation for the physical end of life. A gentle prompt of reality for aging and mortality.

It may or may not persuade one’s perspective of time. It definitely infuses the curiosity to think about it.

 Curiosity could then lead someone down a tunnel of despair thinking about everything they “must do now” with a maintained focus on the ending.

It isn’t about the time urgency to do tasks. It is about the time urgency to be the person you envision being in your life. 

Am I taking the time to love others and myself?

Am I taking the time to appreciate the moments in life?

Am I taking the time to live with inner peace?

 

Looking deeper into these individual questions, the answers reside in the question, “what does this mean to me?”

What living with urgency really means

I believe it is a simple philosophy. 
To live with integrity. To live in your values. To love deeply. To care for yourself. To care for others.

There can be many temptations that get in the way of someone not following this philosophy. In most cases, following the ego leads us astray.

Attachment to the thoughts of anger, disappointment, failure are some of the major attention grabbers for the ego. Depending how intense the attachment is will determine how long the ego will be followed on the journey. Gradually taking someone further and further away from the simple philosophies they want to live by. The perception becomes; they no longer seem simple.

Days, months and years pass. Not realizing the habits and perceptions have denied the proper love and caring that was always wanted.

This includes escaping, avoiding and running away from challenges that life is presenting. Respect must be given for the current state someone is functioning. However, that does not preclude the potential and possibility of shifting that state. Regaining focus and realigning commitment to the things that are most important. Those “things” of importance are what become urgent to care for.

There is a responsibility to act with urgency. Being accountable not only to oneself, but to others that encompass the ripple effect in life’s sphere of connection.

Redemption of integrity is tightly woven into the values of love and caring. It requires being prompt in those aligned actions.

 

Return to wholeness through nature 

Imagine walking through a forest with the trickling flow of water from a stream, overlooking a landscape filled with lush trees and plants.

It can feel so calming, so peaceful.

Being in the presence of nature realigns your energy.

I find it brings me back to my senses.

Just through simple observation of what is seen, concentration on what is heard. Directing my attention to the smells of surrounding plants and vegetation.

There is scientific evidence that suggests a strong connection to nature enhances emotional wellbeing.

Benefits Of Being In Nature

First, the cognitive adjustment in how we think and function is a complimentary benefit. The step of taking a break from electronic screen time and exposure to everyday tasks. Allowing the mind to relax and settle into a peaceful state.

Second, simply taking the initiative to get outside into a space where the senses can be awakened to ascend into a ritual of mindful surrender.

The natural sounds in nature such as birds, wind, etc, have a calming effect throughout the mind and body.

Third, the experience deepens your connection to the natural world and shifts overall mood in the process.

The effects can be noticed with reduced stress, lower blood pressure,  immediately improve concentration and focus, and the release of endorphins which contribute feeling a sense of wellbeing.

Fourth, the experience offers a deeper connection to life. A deeper connection to self.

With that felt connection is the soothing effect it has on mental health.

The ability to relieve anxiety in the moment, to bring calmness in the mind and body.

Nature provides presence with the wonder, possibility, and beauty for the creation of life.

It allows you to surrender to something greater.

An understanding that being alive is enough.

It teaches you about life. You notice the movement from the wind. You see the curiosity in how things grow. Exploration in how these living things adapt and thrive in their environments. There is a powerful possibility in it’s grandeur.

There is an eternal gratitude for nature as the sole supplier to our survival with food, water, shelter, medicine and materials.

It is part of the contributing factors to what brings joy in life.

The benefits of mindful breathing in your day

Instinctively we know how to breathe. It is something we are born to do and is part of everyday life.

Is it something we are conscious of?

The awareness of breath directly impacts many outcomes in regards to overall health.

How we breath is an essential part of regulating stress.

It calms the nervous system. This alleviates the various stress responses that would normally be engaged in survival strategies.

Choices are available that are not manufactured from the reactions of fight or flight response thinking.

Dr. Joe Dispenza, neuroscientist and author, explains clearly how the breath affects the internal functioning in the body;

When we begin to close our eyes and take a couple of slow deep breaths and become aware of it, we’re literally switching nervous systems. 

We switch from that fight or flight nervous system.

As we begin to breathe and we begin to turn on the other nervous system called the parasympathetic nervous system, that nervous system is the nervous system of relaxation.

Your heart rate slows down, your respiratory system slows down, your blood pressure changes. 

All your blood flow goes into your internal organs and into your brain and metabolism, or better said, energy is being rejuvenated and restored and no energy is leaking out to address emergency situations, to address threats.

“By changing patterns of breathing we can change our emotional states, how we think, and how we interact with the world.” 

– Dr. Patricia Gerbarg, Harvard-trained psychiatrist 

Extended Benefits of Mindful Breathing

Overall, the benefits extend to improved focus, increased energy, shifted mood, and effective preparation for quality sleep.

All that is required is becoming aware of your breath. However, being aware of the breath is an action commonly disregarded throughout each day.

“Yoga teachings state that if the mind is moving so are the heart and respiration. 

When we are angry, our breath quickens; when we sleep our breath slows down. 

By consciously slowing down the breath and making it rhythmic so that consciousness is not disturbed by it, we can achieve corresponding tranquility.” 

– Dr. Hiroshi Motoyama, psychologist, philosopher, & researcher 

This means that mindful breathing has the ability to support anxiety and calm it’s intensities.

When stress is perceived, the breathing pattern changes. The breath becomes shallow and short while improper muscles are incorporated in the breathing process. The functioning of the body is disrupted and symptoms of anxiety expand. 

Controlled breathing with slow breaths can bring the body back to operating in a non-stress state so it can function effectively. 

Types of breathing techniques

Depending on your curiosity and experience with breathing techniques, here are some types to try:

  • Lengthen the exhale
  • Equal breathing
  • Resonant breathing
  • Alternate nostril breathing
  • Box breathing

 

Practice breathing into a moment of stress

Imagine a moment of anxiety or tension.

Feel into that moment.

What thoughts are you experiencing? What feelings and emotions are you experiencing?

How is this affecting you in the moment? What are you doing? What are you not doing?

Now, imagine yourself taking a deep breath. Inhaling deeply, and then exhaling slowly and controlled.

As you inhale again, slow the breath and focus on the deep control you have of that breath. Before you begin to exhale, pause for 5 seconds and hold that breath.

At the end of that pause, exhale again slowly.

As you repeat the inhaling, pausing and exhaling a few more times, bring awareness to how that moment has changed.

What is different now?

What do you notice now that wasn’t present before?

What new choices opened up in that moment?

Did you see other benefits that accompanied awareness of your breath?

The awareness of the breath brings you back to your inner self.
Access to your inner knowing and acceptance of trust in the moment.